Pete McKay, D.D.S.​
Family Dentistry

We Cater to Cowards!  


​Call us at
910.673.0113



 


Child Dentistry
​​
New parents often ask, "When should my child first see a dentist?

​"The short answer is "First visit by first birthday." That's the view of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Pediatricians agree. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children who are at risk of early childhood cavities visit a pediatric dentist by age 1.

The idea of such early dental visits is still surprising to many new parents. However, national studies have shown that preschool-aged children are getting more cavities. More than 1 in 4 children in the United States has had at least one cavity by the age of 4. Many kids get cavities as early as age 2.

​To prevent early childhood cavities, parents first have to find out their child's risk of developing cavities. They also need to learn how to manage diet, hygiene and fluoride to prevent problems
.

But cavities aren't all that parents need to learn about their child's dental health. The age 1 dental visit lets parents discuss:
​* How to care for an infant's or toddler's mouth
* Proper use of fluoride
* Oral habits, including finger and thumb sucking
* Ways to prevent accidents that could damage the face and teeth
* Teething and milestones of development
* The link between diet and oral health

​After this first visit, the dentist will suggest a schedule of follow-up visits. In the past, dentists typically called for visits every six months. Now, the schedule may vary according to each child's needs and risks. As your child grows, the dental team at Dr. McKay's can help you learn how to prevent common oral problems.
​​

​What About Preventative Care?

Tooth decay and children no longer have to go hand in hand. At our office we are most concerned with all aspects of preventive care. We use the latest in dental sealant technology to protect your child’s teeth. Dental sealants are space-age plastics that are bonded to the

chewing surfaces of decay-prone back teeth. This is just one of the ways we will set the foundation for your child’s lifetime of good oral health.

Cavity PreventionMost of the time cavities are due to a diet high in sugary foods and a lack of brushing. Limiting sugar intake and brushing regularly, of course, can help. The longer it takes your child to chew their food and the longer the residue stays on their teeth, the greater the chances of getting cavities. Every time someone eats, an acid reaction occurs inside their mouth as the bacteria digests the sugars. This reaction lasts approximately 20 minutes. During this time the acid environment can destroy the tooth structure, eventually leading to cavities. Consistency of a person’s saliva also makes a difference; thinner saliva breaks up and washes away food more quickly. When a person eats diets high in carbohydrates and sugars they tend to have thicker saliva, which in turn allows more of the acid-producing bacteria that can cause cavities.


Tips For Cavity Prevention

Limit frequency of meals and snacks

Encourage brushing, flossing and rinsing

Watch watch your child drinks

Avoid giving your child sticky foods

Make treats part of meals

Choose nutritious snacks


Baby teeth are important as they not only hold space for permanent teeth but they are important to chewing, biting, speech and appearance.